About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
degrees and paris at 10 and very chilly and biting cold in moscow with 3 for your high. here is our extended forecast. >>> our lead story this hour, members of china's communist party are wrapping up their national congress in beijing. many delegates wonder whether departing president huh jin pou will keep hold of power. they include a president with a theory on sustainable growth and they give the same importance to his principles as those of other past leaders. delegates will select about 200 members of the central committee. those members will in turn select a new leader, something that only happens once in a decade. much has already been decided. communist leaders have sent out signals for months that vice president xi jinping will take over as the general secretary. the central committee will then select the standing committee, the apex of power in china. nine people currently sit on the board. that could be reduced to seven. of the current members only xi and khung are expected to remain. some inside the party believe president hu may stay on. others insist he will retire to i
my paris has so f ignored the protests from other european countries. another is that the vast majority of foie gras is consumed in france itself. >> even when there are bands, like in california, or even if it were banned in germany, it would have little influence on our sector. foie gras is different product through and through. it is part of every festive meal. >> foie gras is a culturaicon. for one of our reporter, banning it would be a declaration of war on france. >> people here would turn away from europe even more. they have voted massively against the eu treaties, and that would really put them in opposition. a writer from the area has written a science-fiction novel in which dictators forbid all kinds of things, including foie gras. people then sell them on the blk mket, le they d duri the occupation. >> the 95-year-old grandmother remembers those days. she says the expensive delicacy foie gras used to be eaten almost daily. >> we have always done the forced feeding. at least as far back as the 17th century. so what is the problem? it is better if the geese are fatter
's not until about monday or tuesday. for the time being, single digit temperatures in london and paris. as we look off toward the east, moscow only looking at 2 here for your high on your friday. now here's a look at your extended forecast. >>> we'll be back with more updates in 30 minutes. i'm gene otani in tokyo.
in paris. a documentary by the tv network al jazeera prompted investigators to reopen his case. it said traces of highly toxic radioactive pu loan you mean had been detected on arafat's clothing and other personal belongings and even to this day the cause of arafat's death has not been determined. some palestinians claim he was assassinated by israel. israeli officials deny the claim. >> translator: the palestinians are confident that israel is behind the whole thing. we need to prove this to the rest of the world. >> experts from a swiss laboratory and others will conduct a detailed examination of the samples. they will take several months to conclude and clear up questions of arafat's death. palestinian authorities are determined to get to the bottom of this mystery. nhk world, ramallah. >>> delegates at the u.n. conference on climate change are trying to agree on what to do about global warming. it is becoming clear the climate for compromise has chilled. industrialized countries commitments to the protocol expire at the end of the year. delegates at the meeting in doha, qatar, are d
. london, we're looking only at 6 degrees for your high. paris at 7 degrees. we actually have yellow alert for ice in much of the uk widely posted across the region. madrid only looking at 8 degrees. in fact, we saw snow in spain yesterday. now, let's move over to the asian continent. you can see another rain cloud forming over northern japan. badly hit again as we speak this morning we're looking at this low pressure system over north of hokkaido with this sagging cold front passing through the region leaving behind the wintry pressure pattern that is strengthening. so gusts of 100 kilometers per hour are likely in the next 24 hours which will be picking up those waves as much as five meters high. also snow. we already have a report about 70 centimeters in aomori prefecture. which is in the western flank of northern japan. ongoing snow conditions could trigger avalanche. and blizzard conditions in hokkaido. this is still on tap for you this morning. things will be tapering off, but a very short break due to this other system moving in from southern japan. and will be creating some wet and
homeric, i believe. >> rose: this is what he said in an interview with the paris review. "i have nothing to say about myself directly. i wouldn't know where to begin, in particular since i often look at myself in the mirror and say "whot the hell is that?" >> well, i think he probably had a pretty good idea of who have the hell that was. >> rose: and appreciation of who have the hell that was. >> yes, indeed. although he used mirrors as a metaphor for all kinds of -- i mean in a speech the last paragraph is all about when we look in the mirror. >> rose: is there something to be said or a reason to understand why he moved from poetry early in his life to prose later? >> i think he was always writing poetry and he continued to write poetry throughout the period of writing plays and prose. i think he ran out of gas for plays in the late 20th century but continued to write poetry and poetic prose up until his death. his love for antonia is an extraordinary and remarkable enduring testament to the power of adult relationships. >> rose: and scandalous in its beginning. >> scandalous from other
lived in paris for a bit. i went to spain. i went to italy, i went to ger nanny. i sort of did a lot of europe and read a lot of books. mostly about feminism. >> rose: really? >> yeah. >> rose: why, just understanding where women were. >> yeah. >> rose: today. >> yeah, kind of. a lot of that. >> rose: but did you develop a greater appreciation of sort of where women are, the empowerment of women, you know -- >> i also went, i think there is a lot of work to be done but yeah, absolutely. i did a lot of that but i think it was hugely i left school at 16 so i don't have -- a college. >> rose: you were a goofy kid. >> i was a goofy kid, i was that on occasion. >> rose: you were never a goofy kid. >> no. so i felt like i wanted to sort of take a year out and read, really, and just-- it was fun. >> rose: so i came out of that and started working again. >> rose: how do you know when you're ready to get back on the train? >> a friend of mine who is a director called-- and said come on, come and do this fill well me. and that was it. >> that was it. >> rose: but if he called sex months earlie
had been there for and what she had nurtured us for. >> narrator: the mission in paris was leaderless. someone needed to turn it around, pull it all together. mitt took over. >> he immediately starts kind of establishing himself as a leader within the church because there's a vacuum. >> narrator: those closest to him say the experience had changed him. >> he made a commitment to himself to work as hard. and i think part of that comes from that experience of going overseas and seeing other people, and having life-threatening experiences and deciding that you're going to-what you're going to make out of your life. and he decided he wanted to make the most he could out of his life, and worked as hard as he possibly could to do that. >> narrator: by the early 1980s, barry obama had left hawaii and his grandparents behind. now he was on the mainland, in los angeles, at occidental college. they called it oxy. >> he was the most casual, unpretentious, nicest guy. i mean, my indelible image of him was always in a hawaiian shirt, and some op shorts and flip-flops. i don't know that he had a lo
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8